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a previous president, lyndon b. johnson. joining us is joe who served as a special assistant to lbj and a close adviser to president kennedy as well. he is the author of the awesomely titled what the approximately hell is a presidency for? >> making washington work, a new publication and he joins us now. i am endlessly fascinated with lbj and the life story and the 39s presidency. you can read these books and see the immediate change when jfk dies and lbj assumes the office, there is this bill install and he works his magic and the phones and gets his way on that and gets his way on the tax bill that kennedy couldn't get through. my question is when you look at the great skills and the talents that lbj had dealing with the senate and congress, do they really apply in the era of hyper polarization that we live in? the republican leader. does mitch mcconnell respond with the same? >> i think you have to remember that there was terrific polarization in the 1960s. the democratic party was in control of tourn democrats who were against the kifl rights bills and controlled the mitties. th
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
brother showing up. >> exactly. >> who are these half brothers. with billy carter you had. johnson had samuel johnson, the estranged brothers. we're lucky he doesn't have any strange family aspect. >> well, he does. >> not in this country. >> in kenya. >> a new rule for families. thank you, eugene robinson, for that joy. joy reid, michael steele. howard fineman and i'll be right back with another hour live edition of "hardball." "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, krischris, and thank you for tuning in. we're covering this amazing, historic day in washington. the inauguration of barack obama as our president. right now, the president and the vice president are watching the inaugural parade with groups from all over the country going by and standing in front of the white house. just moments ago, the airmen passed by and got a standing ovation. earlier today, the president gave his second inaugural address, a stirring, passionate call for equality and fairness. forging a more perfect union and helping the country live up to the meaning of its creed. >> we, the
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
continue? earnings on deck today, dupont, johnson & johnson, verizon, ibm and google. investors will also keep a close eye on the dollar after the bank of japan adopted a 2% inflation target to combat deflation. research in motion is rising after its ceo said the blackberry maker is considering selling off its hardware production unit. groupon is suspending gun-related deals while it reviews its current policies. mcdonald's is shelling out $700,000 to the detroit area muslim community after two locations allegedly sold non-menu items when it ran out of food according to islamic dietary law. atari, the classic video gaming system, are going bankrupt in an effort to break free from their debt-ridden french parent. and tech blogger noah zerken was impressed by his recent subway sighting sporting his glasses on the downtown 3 train. that's my train. >>> things can get nasty. we'll explain. >>> plus, prince harry talks about killing taliban insurgents, his family and those naked photos next as "first look" continues on this tuesday morning. who sent it to cindy, who wondered why her soup wasn'
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. ou know who. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zyrtec® starts working at hour one on the first day you take it. claritin® doesn't start working until hour three. zyrtec®. love the air. claritin® doesn't start working until hour three. we've decided to we're all having such a great year in the gulf, put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. >>
or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i think we saw the president saying, what he's wanted to say for 10 years. and republicans as a result, really back on their heels. republicans now may not get anything from this president in the next three clips. this is not a president who's getting ready to cave or to make a deal with them. starting tomorrow, they're going to try to get back on the offensive. tomorrow, they're going to introduce their bill, vote on their bil
biography of johnson. they're talking about how big to be on civil rights and one of the so-called wise men goes to johnson and basically said that's not practical. it's a worthy cause but it's a lost cause. and johnson turns around and goes, what the hell's the presidency for? i actually thought yesterday was an interesting day. it was one of the days where compare it, say, to health care. this was a big idea and the president went out there with an ambitious proposal. the question, though, in american politics now is whether he can match the intensity of the nra. what matters is not simply 60/40, 70/30 in polls. you know that. can he mobilize on a sustained basis? people who really care about this issue? >> and this is another reason why it's such a game changer because so many people have been engaged by the sandy hook massacre, whatever the nra spins, people that want sensible gun safety laws are going to spend three, four, five times as much. mika, also the argument that there's a slippery slope and if you get rid of these military-style assault weapons and the magazines, the high-capa
1965 we saw that shift over to the republican party. they say that in 1965 when president johnson signed the voting rights act, he turned to bill morris' aide and said i believe we have lost the south to the republicans for a very long time. so case in point. we have seen that previously conservative element that was part of the democratic south go to the republican party. changing houses. and at the same time the other shift we're seeing is in the implicit nature of intolerance. so previously we saw explicit intolerance in terms of lynches and poll taxes. but today it's about lazy. it's about being shucking and jiving. and in regards to latinos, it's about being illegal. so we're seeing intolerance repackaged and in a new home. >> well, and i think johnson said we've lost it to the south i think it was 20 years he said we're at 28 now. since he said that. but jonathan, when you look at the fact that -- and you wrote about the general powell's warning. when you look back to 2008, the ugly rhetoric had started. listen to this and watch this. >> our opponent is someone who sees amer
's package. max baucus of montana, senator heidi heitkamp of north dakota, senator johnson of south dakota. senator donnelley of i7d ind. senator begich of alaska, senator manchin of west virginia, senator tester of montana. however, senator mark warner spoke out in favor of the president's plan and said he believes it has bipartisan support. those senators all have a or a-plus ratings from the national rifle association. reid has a b rating. these senators know they will lose their high rating and maybe become a target with the nra if they vote for a sensible assault weapons ban. you see, we had the assault weapons ban back in 1994, but we're so screwed up in washington right now they're even afraid to go back to that. every senator should explain to their constituency why they would not cast a vote for the assault weapons ban. what's the holdup? what are you afraid of? certainly it's not the nra. these senators should not fear the national rifle association. the nra didn't affect any races in the last election cycle and it probably won't do it the next time around. now, if senate democra
during johnson's first six months and turned out to be prophetic and a fair warning. >> yeah, no. 1966 midterms, 46-seat landslide for republicans. great example there. >> absolutely. a lot of democratic governors after the election went to johnson and said, please stop sending this stuff to congress making us look too liberal to get re-elected. >> all right. michael, thank you very much. >> thanks. great to see you all, guys. >> all right. >>> next, what if anything can manti te'o learn when and if he finally comes clean from lance armstrong's confession, aka, how to not be a complete and utter loser? lance is next in the spin as we roll on. it's friday, january 18th. i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyon
congressman dan johnson. good to have you with me this saturday. >> thank you for having me. >> the republican plan is coupled with a no budget, no-pay provision aimed at forcing the senate to pass the budget before an april deadline. if no budget is passed, members of congress, including yourself, don't get paid. what do you think about that proposal? >> well, you know, we have an issue with republicans who can't even control the members in their own caucus thinking that they can control proceedings in the senate and also the president enforced those to do what they want to have done and so they are trying to postpone the day of reckoning basically, for two months and i don't think the scheme is going work. >> so you don't support any part of that proposal? >> well, i mean, if we have a clean debt ceiling bill that comes forward and it's only for three months, that's something that i certainly would consider, but to tie a rise in the debt ceiling to decreasing spending on programs that benefit the middle class, i think it's the republicans' ultimate objective and i certainly do not support th
. johnson & johnson and verizon are a little bit weaker, but five-year highs. we'll see if the market can hold on to this. chris, back to you. >> thank you, becky. >>> next, a small state's big push for gun reform. delaware attorney general beau biden will be here next to talk about the lessons that his state is learning from the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. >>> plus, biding his time? new signs the vice president is making plans to be back on inaugural podium in four years, this time in a little bit different role. could the third time be the charm for joe biden? >>> but first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. as peter mentioned, he will be attending the national prayer service this morning and then the staff ball later this evening. you're watching "the daily rundown." it is only on msnbc. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of co
. joe johnson, nets down one. the jumper. it goes from the wing. the nets take a one-point lead. final seconds of the game, desperation, and that's your game. the nets win in new york. 88-85. that's a split of the seen series at 2-2. and now the nets are only one game back of the knicks in the standings. and barnicle's celtics are right there, not playing too badly. >>> how about john walsh taking the team on his shoulders. there against portland last night facing the trail blazers. under 15 seconds to go, matthews with the three to tie it at 95-95. maybe headed to overtime. what's jordan crawford have to say? here's the three from 31 feet. good! whoa! jordan crawford with the game winner. the wizards only have nine wins on the season and now have won 5 of their 7. might be worth it to actually go see a wizards game. >>> on now to the nfl where the wife of the patriots player is causing controversy with a post-game critique of one of her husband's opponents. anna welker, wife of patriots receiver wes welker, took to facebook to vent some frustration after the pats' loss to the ravens o
to serve all the people justly and fairly? vote for president johnson on november 3rd. the stakes are too high for you to stay home. >> congressman grimm, is there an anti-new york attitude in the republican party nationally, anti-new york? >> i don't think so. i mean, there's always been a little bias against new york. i think that goes way back. there's no question. i've seen it and felt it. but i think what we have right now is just, you know, the deep-rooted concern overall that the country is spending money that it doesn't have and the need to be fiscally responsible, which i wholeheartedly agree with and i respect, it's just when things like this happen, natural disasters -- >> i didn't hear this during katrina. when the southerners were voting their own pocketbooks, when the southern republicans were helping themselves out in what was really a tragedy as well as this one and it was very vivid, maybe more vivid in terms of national coverage than new york, i got to tell you, i didn't hear anybody talking about offsets. i heard them saying let's get the money to people like haley barb
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
that johnson was asking for all those big things together really helped. >> the end of the iraq war was not marked as a massive occasion in this country when it happened. there was some primetime news programs that didn't cover it the day that it happened, the day that was the end of the war. but people, when you ask them broadly in the country, end up ranking ending the war as president obama's greatest single accomplishment in his first four years. what explains the primacy of that in memory, even as it was buried in the news as we went through it? >> well, go back to the democratic primaries of 2008. what was the biggest issue? barack obama probably became the nominee largely because he was against the war at the beginning. hillary clinton was for it. so people obviously noticed the absence of that. but even more than that, i'm sure you're wiser than i was. but four years ago i could not imagine that anyone who was president could not only have gotten us completely out of this war, but also do so without that government in iraq collapsing, and more so, without an angry domestic b
in and attacked that. now, in my opinion that wasn't partisan. it was his vision of america. as lyndon johnson had a vision of the great society. it wasn't anti-republican. it was his vision. john kennedy, the new frontier. i think the president from the way i was taking it was saying i think b this is the vision america needs to go in. but it wasn't for just four years. he said we're not talking four months, four years, or 400 years. >> that's exactly right. and you played the clip talking about how the social safety net allows us to take risks and not fear the failure. other countries don't have that. i spent a lot of time in india where there was such a fear of taking on new initiatives and being entrepreneurial because there wasn't that same safety net in place. that is the progressive vision. let's be real. paul ryan, here's a guy who supports privatizing social security, voucherizing medicare. so the president is not putting up a strawman argument. these are exactly the principles that republicans support. and also republicans have never been comfortable with social security and medicare. th
-time ally, liberia's president ellen johnson surleaf. >> it's important to be here today to see that you have fully recovered from your recent illness. >>> on "today" chelsea clinton speaks for the first time about her mom's recovery. >> she is exuding the energy, the vibrancy, and certainly the mental acuty that she always has. i am so grateful that she is not only fine, but healthy and vibrant and strong and, you know, god willing, will be for the next 65 years of her life. >> and chelsea clinton is also chairing the national day of service on saturday. more on that to come. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the political cavalry has arrived. new york senator chuck schumer has given his seal of approval to president obama's defense nominee. any decision that could rally senate democrats and signal an easier path to confirmation for former senator chuck hagel. joining us now washington post columnist greta -- white house correspondent kristen welker. welcome both. kristen, what is the white house, breathing a huge sigh of relief now that they've reeled chuck schumer in o
from new hampshire, johnson and washington bureau chief susan page and congressman from maryland and former naacp president. welcome all of you. >> thank you. >> i want to start with guns. congressman. do you think -- were you surprised that the president went as big as he did? of course i really wasn't. the president got elected after a long, tough struggle to put forth a vision. i think this is the first part of the vision. i don't think it was planned. i think what happened in the tragedy here kind of spurred him in that direction. and you know, this use of executive order as we have seen since 1933 when fdr first went to the congress and asked for those powers. so they have been around. this is a bold effort. and i think he did so many executive orders, simply to try to increase some of the pressure on the congress and on others. >> in 1994, you had a hard time getting this done and you had democratic congress. john, you're from a state, live free or die. even if you're a democrat or republican, you're unified when it comes to all things guns. is there any part of this you th
to confront this issue while in office, pretty rare. johnson did it in 1968. got a pretty watered down bill. >> harold, there's been a lot of washington analysis about how far any of this is going to go. i, for one, think that we are in -- newtown was an inflexion point, and i do think that the landscape has changed, and i don't know that it's as trite as if you believe in magic, but eugene robinson has an op ed, and i think we are well to listen -- we would do well to listen to eugene's words, which basically amount to don't listening to those that say that president obama's bold plan to reduce gun violence, including an assault weapons ban, has no chance in congress. i seem to recall that health care reform is deemed impossible too until it happened. >> i would agree with you. there is not only a change in how people view guns and particularly n.r.a. members. i was an nra member. i am no longer a member. i just declined membership after a while. newtown didn't do it. there's a culture in the country, as many know, who believe that guns are part of recreation and sport. they take their kid
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
estimate record was 1.2 million who came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. in america today we're running out of a vital resource we need to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] officemax can help you drive suand down.s down... use your maxperks card and get a 10-ream case of officemax multiuse paper for just 4.99 after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. >>> welcome back to "hardball." president obama yest
in these four years, j. johnson at the pentagon gave a speech saying we need to think about when we bring the war on terror to a close. when is it over? >> it's never over. >> that is the problem. we had a person on the program who is the only one to vote against the use of military force. it's the document from which all authority flows. she is proposing we repeal that operation. we are out of afghanistan. osama bin laden is dead. al qaeda is the al qaeda that attacked us has been destroyed. >> if you do it and there's an attack on american soil then you are the president who ended the war on terror. this is a president of any ideology, of any party. >> 1,000% the problem. >> yeah. >> you are taking on tremendous political risk. the reason they endure is because part of the calculation is that. if you are the one -- this is true about guantanamo. if they had closed guantanamo and took the right position to close it. it's not closed because of congressional opposition. if you close it and god forbid someone who is a guantanamo deta detainee, the political blowback would be insane. it's no
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
that you mentioned, but lyndon baines johnson and other presidents that in the second term things happen o outside of their reach, and he needs to be cognizant of history. >> thank you both for being here in person. >> happy inauguration. >> and yes. nice glasses. did you get them just for the inauguration. >> no, i didn't, but thank you. >> let's get going on the hearings and benghazi that are going to be happening this week, and congresswoman karen bass sits on the house foreign relations committee that will hear secretary clinton's testimony and joining me live now. always a pleasure, congresswoman. >> thank you. thanks for having me on. >> both of the senate and the house will hear from secretary clinton for the first time on benghazi, and what do you want to hear from secretary clinton? >> well, first of all, it is number one, good to see her and wish her the best. i am glad to know that she is feeling better, but i have to tell you that the state department has already put out a report that has identified 29 areas of recommendations, and we did have a hearing on benghazi just a few w
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)